Amazon to Buy Whole Foods for $13.7 Billion

Amazon, the Seattle-based e-commerce giant, is set to buy healthy supermarket chain Whole Foods for $13.7 billion, Amazon confirmed on Friday.


The company will pay $42 per share for Whole Foods, representing a 27 percent premium on its current share price of $33. Shares of Whole Foods were halted from trading as the market opened on Friday.

“Millions of people love Whole Foods Market because they offer the best natural and organic foods, and they make it fun to eat healthy,” Amazon Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos said in a statement.

It’s Amazon’s biggest deal ever, easily surpassing its $970 million acquisition of video service Twitch in 2014.

For years, the company has looked to dive into the $800 billion grocery industry, but its customers have been slow to embrace buying milk from the same site they buy their books from.

John Mackey, Whole Foods’ embattled co-founder and CEO, will continue to run the grocery chain after an internal push to sell the company. There are about 450 Whole Foods stores worldwide.

Wall Street responded positively to the deal for Amazon, with its stock price jumping more than 3 percent as it pushes towards $1,000 a share.

The deal is expected to close later this year.

11 Coolest Products at CES Asia, From Order-Taking Robots to VR Fishing (Photos)


  • CES Asia

    CES Asia, the three-year-old overseas version of the annual Las Vegas tech extravaganza, took over five halls at the Shanghai New International Expo Center to showcase the latest and greatest in consumer technology — which included plenty of robots, smart appliances and self-driving cars. A full 450 exhibiting companies and more than 30,000 attendees test drove some products at the bleeding edge of innovation. 

    Matt Pressberg


  • Cowarobot CES Asia

    Cowarobot autonomous suitcase
    This is not your typical overnight bag. The rolling suitcase from China’s Cowarobot can identify and follow its owner through airport concourse traffic, avoiding obstacles along the way. It also automatically locks depending on distance from the owner, alerts when it’s more than a safe distance away. 

    Matt Pressberg


  • Pico Neo DKS CES Asia

    Pico Neo DKS
    The Pico Neo DKS is a wireless virtual reality rig that plays like a full-fledged PC setup, with a 2.5K 5.5 inch HD screen that smooths out the often-blurry and clunky gameplay of most mobile VR devices. The setup uses Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 820 processor to deliver substantial computing power.

    Matt Pressberg


  • HiScene HiAR CES Asia

    HiScene HiAR
    Like the Neo DKS, one of CES Asia’s buzziest augmented reality headsets also features the Qualcomm Snapdragon 820 processor. The HiAR goggles, which feel heftier than many other AR sets, use artificial intelligence as part of an always-on voice control capability — as augmented reality continues to move toward a “Minority Report” future.

    Matt Pressberg


  • Shadow Creator CES Asia

    Shadow Creator Halomini
    In case you hadn’t noticed, virtual and augmented reality was kind of a big deal at CES Asia – as it was at the flagship Vegas show earlier this year. Shadow Creator’s Halomini headset, which feels like a lighter version of Microsoft’s HoloLens, allows users to set appointments, chat with friends and watch videos, while keeping their eyes on whatever it was they’re watching.

    Matt Pressberg


  • Ovo Danovo CES Asia

    Ovo Technology Danovo
    CES Asia is full of robots, but the Danovo stood out for its fun personality – as much as that applies to an inanimate object. The egg-shaped machine from China’s Ovo Technology can navigate around items, dance, engage with people, and even project video by sliding over the top of its “shell.” Ovo also makes trash collecting and security robots, but they’re a lot more serious than the Danovo.

    Matt Pressberg


  • Holoera CES Asia

    Gowild Holoera
    Virtual reality can be lonely, which is why Gowild decided to add a friend. “Amber,” a 3D hologram who lives inside its pyramid-shaped Holoera device, can respond to commands, read moods – and cheer users up with a well-timed song.

    Matt Pressberg


  • Qihan Sanbot CES Asia

    Qihan Sanbot
    Another entry in CES Asia’s parade of robots was Qihan’s Sanbot, which is based on IBM’s “Jeopardy!”-winning Watson operating system. Sanbot can recognize and communicate with customers in 30 languages and process credit card payments. It also does a delightful dance, complete with glowing, gyrating limbs.

    Matt Pressberg


  • Baidu Little Fish CES Asia

    Baidu Little Fish
    The smart speaker from Chinese tech giant Baidu is the country’s answer to the Amazon Echo, only with a high-resolution 8-inch screen and camera that turns to face the user. It can handle the basics like controlling smart-home devices and playing music, and its face-recognition software allows authorized users to order food and medicine. 

    Matt Pressberg


  • PowerRay CES Asia

    PowerVision Power Ray
    The fishing robot includes ocean mapping, an integrated fish luring light and even an optional remote bait drop feature that allows users to place the hook wherever they want. Its camera shoots in 4K UHD and is capable of 1080p real-time streaming. It even connects with the Zeiss VR One Plus VR headset to turn real-life fishing into a virtual reality game.

    Matt Pressberg


  • JD JDrone CES Asia

    JD JDrone
    The unmanned aircraft is part of a plan from China’s second-biggest online retailer, JD.com, to use drones to deliver products that weigh as much as one metric ton. The company is also developing fully-automated warehouses.

    Matt Pressberg


  • CarMew CES Asia

    Itonology CarMew C1
    This lighter socket-mounted device gives cars high-speed wi-fi, allowing people in them (preferably not driving) to get work done and stream music. It connects near field FM, auxiliary dual channels and car audio, and enables sharing of 4G networks.

    Matt Pressberg



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The Chinese version of the annual tech extravaganza featured plenty of robots and serious advances in mobile virtual reality

CES Asia, the three-year-old overseas version of the annual Las Vegas tech extravaganza, took over five halls at the Shanghai New International Expo Center to showcase the latest and greatest in consumer technology — which included plenty of robots, smart appliances and self-driving cars. A full 450 exhibiting companies and more than 30,000 attendees test drove some products at the bleeding edge of innovation. 


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