Disneyland shuts down 2 cooling towers after Legionnaires’ illness sickens park visitors

Disneyland has close down dual bacteria-contaminated cooling towers after Orange County health officials rescued several cases of Legionnaires’ illness in people who had visited a Anaheim thesis park, authorities said.


Twelve cases of a bacteria-caused illness were rescued about 3 weeks ago among people who had spent time in Anaheim and enclosed 9 people who had visited Disneyland in Sep before building a illness, according to a Orange County Health Care Agency. Their ages ranged from 52 to 94.

The remaining 3 were Orange County residents who did not revisit a park yet lived or trafficked in Anaheim.

Ten were hospitalized and one chairman “with additional health issues” died, according to health officials. That chairman did not revisit Disneyland.

Legionnaires’ is a serious lung infection caused by bearing to infested H2O or mist. Authorities pronounced they have not tied any other cases of Legionnaires’ to Anaheim given September.

“There is no famous ongoing risk compared with this outbreak,” a medical group pronounced in a statement.

The towers are in a backstage area nearby a New Orleans Square Train Station, any some-more than 100 feet from areas permitted to guests, a Disneyland Resort mouthpiece pronounced Friday. A Disneyland worker is among those who fell ill with a disease.

“On Oct. 27, we schooled from a Orange County Health Care Agency of increasing Legionnaires’ illness cases in Anaheim. We conducted a examination and schooled that dual cooling towers had towering levels of Legionella bacteria,” Dr. Pamela Hymel, arch medical officer for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, pronounced in a matter Friday. “These towers were treated with chemicals that destroy a germ and are now close down.”

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention told county authorities about 3 weeks ago of several cases of a illness among people who had trafficked to Orange County in September. County epidemiologists rescued that a cluster of people diagnosed with a illness had recently visited, lived or worked in Anaheim and contacted Disney after training that several of them had left to a thesis park.

According to a health agency, on Nov. 3 Disney reported that slight contrast had rescued towering levels of Legionella in dual cooling towers a month earlier, and a towers had been disinfected. Disney took a towers out of use on Nov. 1, achieved some-more contrast and disinfection, and brought them behind into use on Nov. 5.

Disney took a towers out of use again on Tuesday in allege of an sequence a health group expelled a following day requiring they sojourn down until exam formula determine they are giveaway from Legionella contamination.

The towers had been incited off on Nov. 1 before Disney schooled that Legionella had been detected, Disneyland Resort mouthpiece Suzi Brown said. “The usually reason they were incited behind on was as partial of a serve disinfection process.”

The county health group has also alerted medical providers to demeanour for Legionnaires’ illness in anyone who might have turn ill after visiting Anaheim or Disneyland before Nov. 7.

It takes dual to 10 days for symptoms of Legionnaires’ to appear.

The illness is caused by Legionella bacteria that grow in H2O and can widespread when tiny droplets get into a atmosphere and people breathe them in, according to a CDC. Outbreaks are mostly traced to prohibited tubs, musical fountains, cooling towers and vast air-conditioning systems that evacuate H2O fog into a air. Legionnaires’ is not widespread chairman to person.

The illness can be treated with antibiotics and sanatorium care, yet about 1 in 10 people who get Legionnaires’ illness die from a infection. Most during risk are people comparison than 50 with enervated defence systems or ongoing lung diseases.

Orange County has available some-more than 55 cases of a illness this year and has seen a series of cases burst in new years. A identical ceiling trend has been seen nationally and elsewhere in Southern California, according to a medical agency, yet what’s causing that is unclear.

tony.barboza@latimes.com

@tonybarboza


UPDATES:

6:55 a.m.: Updated with a quote from mouthpiece Brown.

This essay was initial published during 5:25 a.m.


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