NASA’s Johnson Space Center Braces for More Flooding from Harvey

As a sleet continues currently (Aug. 29), NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston is fresh for some-more flooding from Tropical Storm Harvey.


According to JSC’s puncture government news service, a space core will sojourn sealed currently to non-mission-essential organisation — sum rainfall has reached some-more than 42 inchesat a building that houses NASA’s Mission Control, a use said. Flash inundate warnings will continue until 11:15 p.m. internal time.

The JSC’s puncture Twitter feed has ceaselessly posted updates, stating progressing currently that they will weigh when it’s protected for teams to check a facility’s bedrooms and infrastructure.

 

Tropical Storm Harvey fills a International Space Station's cupola in this print taken by NASA wanderer Randy Bresnik.
Credit: Randy Bresnik/Twitter

Meanwhile, NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite has monitored a storm’s fast intensification, NASA officials said in a statement.

“The images uncover Harvey’s limit breeze speeds increasing from approximately 56 miles per hour (25 meters per second) to about 107 miles per hour (47.8 meters per second) in a 36 hours only before landfall,” NASA officials said. Several other US booster have also kept tabs on a storm.

Ocean aspect breeze speeds as imaged by NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite on Aug. 24 and Aug. 26. Red indicates top breeze speed.
Credit: NASA/JPL

Aboard a International Space Station, organisation members continue to document a storm’s sprawling swirl: “This large charge covers most of a setting from adult here,” NASA wanderer Randy Bresnik wrote yesterday (Aug. 28).

At slightest 9 have died, and some-more than 30,000 people in Houston and a Gulf Coast might need proxy preserve in a arise of a storm, that strike Texas’ southeast seashore Friday night (Aug. 25), a Los Angeles Times reported. The area continues to be dangerous in a face of postulated flooding. 

“As shortly as it becomes possible, we will consider a damage, rebuild, support any other and continue carrying out the mission,” Ellen Ochoa, JSC’s director, wrote in an update this morning. “My thoughts are with we as we continue this charge together.” 

Email Sarah Lewin during slewin@space.com or follow her @SarahExplains. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original essay on Space.com


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