Oculus’ Santa Cruz gets closer to a destiny of wireless VR

We weren’t authorised to take photos of a headset, though a print seen here offers a good illustration of what it looks like. From a filigree fabric surrounding a arrangement to a tractable conduct straps, a latest Santa Cruz antecedent now looks roughly like a wireless chronicle of a Rift. It has an effervescent tag along a top, while a back cosmetic appears to be clad in a soothing elastomer shell.


Putting it on was surprisingly easy — we only wore it like a back ball tip — and we was prepared to go with only minimal adjustment. There’s an IPD (interpupillary distance) circle on a left underside if we wish to adjust that too. On a whole, a headset feels soft, cosy and lightweight — simply one of a many gentle VR headsets I’ve ever tried.

Then, an Oculus supporter placed a new Santa Cruz controllers on my hands. They now feel most some-more compress than a Touch, with a fatter, stubbier grip. Also important is a miss of a thumbstick; in a place is a vast round touchpad. One large reason for this pattern disproportion is that a Oculus folks wanted a infrared LED ring to face upwards, in sequence to get improved tracking from a headset. And in sequence to pierce a ring to a top, some pattern adjustments had to be made. The hold and trigger buttons are still there, however, and feel easy adequate to press.

I was now launched into a demo, where we was educated to feed and play with an darling dog-dinosaur quadruped hybrid. we used my practical hands to bravery fruit from a tree and feed them to it, and we also threw a hang into a stretch to have a quadruped fetch it for me. And since we wasn’t tethered to a PC, we could travel around a room with palliate and didn’t have to worry about tripping over wires. Using a controllers as practical hands felt flattering healthy (thanks to a 6DOF tracking), and we got used to it sincerely quickly.

I was afterwards guided to nonetheless another demo, and it was set in a Dead and Buried universe, where we was educated to deflect off zombies. This time, feeling untethered unequivocally done a large difference. we was means to pitch around 360-degrees and fire a undead that were entrance during me from all sides. What’s more, we was means to travel around a room to collect adult additional weapons and rigging (they enclosed a shotgun, dynamite and a large shield). we even pulpy down on an Acme-style TNT explosve detonator to set off an area of explosion.

In a way, it was a small unnerving to have so most freedom. we held myself not wanting to pierce too distant forward, in fear of going outward of my section and bumping into a wall. we had to arrange of demeanour underneath my headset each so mostly to make certain we wasn’t too tighten to any seat or obstacles. we wasn’t during all — a Oculus helpers would’ve told me differently — though we still felt overly discreet during times.

Another thing that struck me was a audio. we had no headphones on, and still a audio came by shrill and clear. That is interjection to a Santa Cruz’s spatial audio tech, that lets we listen to a diversion audio though any headphones. we unequivocally appreciated this, since we was means to listen to a people around me while also interacting with a game.

On a whole, a knowledge was truly amazing. It was unequivocally as if we was regulating a Rift, though though being trustworthy to a PC. It’s transparent that truly wireless VR is where Oculus is going — while Go appears to be positioned as a entry-level version, Santa Cruz seems like a one we unequivocally want.

Of course, Oculus is discerning to indicate out that Santa Cruz is still in antecedent stage, and a final product competence not demeanour like this during all. The controllers competence demeanour and feel totally opposite in a end. Seeing as what we attempted felt flattering good already, a final chronicle of Santa Cruz seems really earnest indeed. Oculus will be shipping a Santa Cruz headsets to developers subsequent year, and we’re anticipating it’s as good as we consider it’ll be.


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