SEE IT: Monopoly man pops up behind former Equifax CEO at Senate hearing

The board game is rigged.


Much like his company exposed over 145 million people’s Social Security numbers to hackers, the former CEO of Equifax got exposed to some trolling when he went to Washington, D.C., Wednesday to discuss his company’s massive data breach.

Appearing over the shoulder of Richard Smith as he addressed the Senate Banking Committee was a figure well known to Monopoly enthusiasts: Rich Uncle Pennybags.

Amanda Werner, an arbitration campaign manager for the protest group Public Citizen and Americans for Financial Reform, put on the trademark top hat, gold-rimmed monocle and supremely bushy mustache to call attention to forced arbitration clauses, CNBC reports.

Equifax, Wells Fargo reveal what’s wrong with forced arbitration

The Monopoly man put in an appearance at the Equifax hearing Wednesday. It’s unclear if his financial data was stolen in the massive breach.

The Monopoly man put in an appearance at the Equifax hearing Wednesday. It’s unclear if his financial data was stolen in the massive breach.

(AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS)

“Forced arbitration clauses buried in the fine print of take-it-or-leave-it contracts may be the single most important tool that predatory banks, payday lenders, credit card companies and other financial institutions have used to escape accountability for cheating and defrauding consumers,” Public Citizen said in a press release.

As embarrassing as it was to have an obscenely wealthy fictional character photobombing him, Smith still might’ve preferred it to the treatment he got Tuesday from the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

There, members of Congress roundly attacked him with bipartisan fury, with ranking Democrat on the Consumer Protection Subcommittee, Jan Schakowsky, deeming his testimony “unconvincing,” while Rep. Greg Walden was even harsher.

Rich Uncle Pennybags pulled out some money to wipe his forehead during the tense hearing.

Rich Uncle Pennybags pulled out some money to wipe his forehead during the tense hearing.

(Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

“I don’t think we can pass a law that … fixes stupid,” said Walden.

Top N.Y. financial regulator wants to sink ‘teeth’ into Equifax

Meanwhile, it was reported Tuesday that the IRS has for some reason issued a no-bid contract to the company, agreeing to pay them $7.25 million to verify the identity of taxpayers and prevent fraud.

For all that Smith has had to endure this week, he’ll still be passing Go and collecting nearly $90 million as part of his retirement package.

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