SpaceX Rocket to Launch 10 Satellites Early Monday: How to Watch Live

The private spaceflight association SpaceX is scheduled to launch 10 communications satellites into low-Earth circuit early Monday (Oct. 9), and we can watch it live online. 


A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to blast off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California during 8:37 a.m. EDT (5:37 a.m. PDT/1237 GMT), carrying 10 satellites for Iridium Communications. A live webcast is approaching to start shortly before a opening of a launch window, and we can watch it on SpaceX’s website, or here during Space.com.

The satellites are partial of a Iridium Next constellation, that will eventually include of 66 primary satellites and 9 on-orbit backup satellites (as good as 6 backups that will sojourn on a ground). This is a third of eight scheduled SpaceX launches for a Iridium Next constellation, and will move a sum series of satellites in circuit to 30. 

The reusable Falcon 9 booster that will be used in tomorrow’s launch is creation a initial flight, a association deputy told Space.com. It finished a static-fire exam on Thursday (Oct. 5). SpaceX will try to land a upholder honest on a worker boat in a Pacific Ocean following a launch so it can be used on a destiny mission. SpaceX has successfully landed a Falcon 9 initial theatre rocket 16 times and reflown dual boosters this year.

A painting of an Iridium NEXT satellite in orbit.
Credit: Iridium Communications

Iridium Communications announced progressing this week it had begun contrast and validating a Iridium Certus service, that will use a Iridium Next satellites to yield a “truly tellurian broadband service” to a users, according to a statement from a company. The 66 satellites will widespread out around a world to yield use to remote regions of a globe, a association has said. 

“Iridium Certus is going to essentially change a standing quo in satellite connectivity for aviation, maritime, land-mobile, Internet of Things (IoT) and supervision users,” pronounced Matt Desch, Iridium’s CEO, in a statement. “Achieving this vital miracle continues a movement for a goal to broach world-changing broadband services and applications designed to assistance a partners yield vicious connectivity solutions, both standalone and in support of other broadband technologies.”

The blurb use is approaching to be accessible in a “early second quarter” of 2018, according to a statement.

On Wednesday (Oct. 11), another SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is scheduled to launch from NASA’s Launch Complex 39A during a Kennedy Space Center in Florida, carrying another communications satellite called SES 11/EchoStar 105.

The Falcon 9 upholder for that launch, that was behind from Oct. 7, has already done one spaceflight. On Feb. 19, a upholder helped launch a Dragon load boat to broach NASA reserve to a International Space Station and made a pinpoint alighting on a SpaceX worker ship.

Elon Musk wrote on Instagram this week that a association would also try to land that upholder again.

Follow Calla Cofield @callacofield. Follow us @Spacedotcom, Facebook and Google+. Original essay on Space.com.


Do you have an unusual story to tell? E-mail stories@tutuz.com